Disclaimer: The information, articles, and tips portrayed on this blog, while based on research, do not constitute medical advice. The opinions expressed are meant to educate and inform, but not to dictate lifestyle choices or personal beliefs. These articles are meant to provoke thought on issues surrounding college health and to inform the Hopkins community of healthy information and resources.

10.13.2014

SEE Mindfully

10.13.2014
SEE Tip: As part of Love Your Body Week, when it comes to eating well, consider practicing the art of mindful eating.  To get started, try some of these tips:

1. Try sitting at a table, rather than on a couch or bed.
2. Before picking up the food to eat, take a few deep breaths to allow your mind and body to settle and relax.
3. Appreciate the food in front of you.  Where is it from?  How did it get to your plate?  How does it look?  What about smell?  What do you like about it?  How does it feel (either in your hands or mouth or both)?


4.  How is your mind responding to the food?  Is it too hot, too cold, bland, or spicy?  Take your time to chew the food and allow your mind to process what you are doing and how you feel about it.
5. If you notice your mind wandering, try to bring your attention back to what you are doing to stay present in the moment.
6.  Once you are done, take a moment to notice if you are satisfied by your meal, and if so, move on with the next part of your day.

Want to practice mindful eating with a snack?  Stop by the Breezeway today starting at 11:30am for a mindful bite with the PEEPs!



HKB Quit Tip: When it comes to practicing mindfulness, it turns out that incorporating this practice into one's daily life can actually help smokers cut down on how much they smoke.  In a recent study, it is believed that the practice of mindful meditation may have helped smokers use more personal control and be better able to cope with their symptoms of the addiction to nicotine.



Mellow Out Monday:  Fall break is upon us, but before we get there, of course, there are about 2 midterms and a paper to get through first.  Instead of feeling overwhelmed and stressed by everything, try taking three deep breaths and repeat this mantra: I will get through this.  Why?  Because you will.  Also, because deep breathing promotes calmness in the body by increasing oxygen to your brain and stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system.  Yes, simply breathing (but deep breathing in particular) can help reduce stress.

Another way to bust stress?  Try Stressbusters tonight starting at 8pm on Q level in MSE for a FREE back rub!


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