Disclaimer: The information, articles, and tips portrayed on this blog, while based on research, do not constitute medical advice. The opinions expressed are meant to educate and inform, but not to dictate lifestyle choices or personal beliefs. These articles are meant to provoke thought on issues surrounding college health and to inform the Hopkins community of healthy information and resources.

6.01.2010

Weekend Sip Tip

6.01.2010
It may seem odd that the word "buzzed" is associated with a depressant like alcohol. In small amounts (BAC of .02 to .08), alcohol can produce a euphoric, relaxed sensation. After that point is when the depressant effects can start to roll in. To counter this, many people mix alcohol with an actual buzz: caffeine. Combining alcohol and caffeine can have negative consequences on the body and your decisions. In fact, a study found that students who combined alcohol and energy drinks were more likely to be hurt or injured, require medical attention, ride with an intoxicated driver, take advantage of others, or be taken advantage of themselves. The dangers have become so prevalent that the FDA has even begun investigations on caffeinated alcoholic beverages. If you choose to drink, avoid adding caffeine to the equation. It can hide the effects of alcohol, making you feel less intoxicated than you truly are. Remember, even though you may not feel drunk, your BAC can still reach dangerous levels. Instead, focus on keeping a safe buzz with responsible consumption of alcohol. Keep it to one uncaffeinated drink an hour and Stop@Buzzed!

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